detropiaresearch:

Alan Hill: The Man who lives In Detroit’s Abandoned Packard Auto Plant

Yes, the Packard Plant is so giant and empty and strange they shoot Michael Bay movies there.  And, occasionally, kids push a dump truck out a window.  Yet, Hill has power, Internet access, a welding setup, and a small kitchen.  He even maintains a webcam. The owner apparently gave him his blessing so long as Hill works as a custodian of the property.

When it opened in 1903, the luxury car factory, designed by famed architect Albert Kahn, was one of the largest and most modern factories in the world.  It closed in 1956, and today stands as a tragic reminder of Detroit’s industrial demise.  There has been talk of demolishing the iconic plant for some 15 years, but despite recent promises by the current owner, nothing has happened yet.

(via ryanpanos)

tribecafilm:

Brilliant Consistency: The Career of Philip Seymour Hoffman

I miss you.

camistardust:

Tomboy  (FRA, 2011)
Trailer here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JvfdCI4MArQ
(L)

camistardust:

Tomboy  (FRA, 2011)

Trailer here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JvfdCI4MArQ

(L)

crefited:

Personally speaking, I can’t wait to watch life tear you apart.

speakingparts:

WINTER’S BONE (DEBRA GRANIK, 2010)

madeofcelluloid:

'Short Term 12', Destin Cretton (2013)

I also found the “draft” of the film above, with the same name. Click here to watch it.

little-trouble-grrrl:

another screenshot of the punk singer!

little-trouble-grrrl:

another screenshot of the punk singer!

90spunkrockfeminism:

bikini kill footage in the punk singer

all boys be cool, for once in your lives

you’re so cool, you’re so cool, you’re so cool…

brightwalldarkroom:

“All of these locations and all of these songs would not have the effect they do without the widescreen black and white cinematography of Gordon Willis. This is one of the best-photographed movies ever made… Some of the scenes are famous just because of Willis’ lighting. For example, the way Isaac and Mary walk through the observatory as if they’re strolling among the stars or on the surface of the moon. Later, as their conversation gets a little lost, Willis daringly lets them disappear into darkness, and then finds them again with just a sliver of side-lighting.”
—Roger Ebert, on Manhattan (1979)

brightwalldarkroom:

“All of these locations and all of these songs would not have the effect they do without the widescreen black and white cinematography of Gordon Willis. This is one of the best-photographed movies ever made… Some of the scenes are famous just because of Willis’ lighting. For example, the way Isaac and Mary walk through the observatory as if they’re strolling among the stars or on the surface of the moon. Later, as their conversation gets a little lost, Willis daringly lets them disappear into darkness, and then finds them again with just a sliver of side-lighting.”

—Roger Ebert, on Manhattan (1979)

(Source: brightwalldarkroom)